Notes on Addis: A Look Back

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This week, I was thrilled to see Addis Ababa listed at #13 on the New York Times’ Top 52 places in the world to visit. Why? According to the headline: “An ambitious art scene heads toward the international stage.” Anyone who has been there knows this to be true. This time last year, I got to see Addis for myself. PThe Times highlights Asni Gallery, which stood only doors away from my hotel. I had a chance to meet the gracious gallery owner, Konjit Seyoum. If you’re in Addis Ababa, go to Asni. FYI: They have a small, but delicious lunch and dinner menu.

Teaching African Art at the Alle School of Fine Arts and Design
Teaching African Art at the Alle School of Fine Arts and Design

I was initially hesitant to leave my family for three weeks (The Grind: Going to Ethiopia (Or Can Parents Really Have it All?), but I joined my Wellesley College colleagues multi-media artist David Teng Olsen and Ethiopian native and filmmaker Salem Mekuria. Salem, really was the one responsible for bringing us both to Addis. She arranged an invitation from the Alle School of Fine Arts and Design to teach the History of the Arts of Africa.  What a joy to speak to an engaged audience of students and faculty over a series of days. It was humbling, really. I had the renown artist, Bekele Mekonnen, listening. Also, in the seats sat the young artist and Director of the Netsa Art Village, Mihret Kebebe. She was one of many fine hosts that extended her friendship during my time there and even today (thanks to Twitter and email). I’m grateful for all the memories that came swirling back this week. The food. The people. The ART. 

Upon my return, I had an opportunity to thank the Friends of the Wellesley College Library directly for the funding to donate books to the Alle School’s library in the Spring 2013 newsletter.

Screen Shot 2014-01-15 at 11.37.45 PMFor my posts from Ethiopia, see the following:

Notes on Addis: Arrival

Notes on Addis: Art in the Making 

Notes on Addis: Netsa Art Village

Notes on Addis: Departure

Notes from Addis: Departure

Elizabeth Habte Wold, "Africa Rising"
Elizabeth Habte Wold, “Africa Rising”

My journey to Ethiopia has come to an end. I look forward to coming back because Africa is rising for me. Not the sentimental Africa that has filled my historical imagination of suspended roots of Yoruba, Fon or Mende, but rather a real Africa, an experienced Africa that surely extends beyond a myopic idea of Africa.  I’ve known this as I’ve been studying the arts of Africa for nearly twenty years and teaching on the complexities and dynamism of the continent for the last four. My concentration has always been on Western and Central Africa and the diaspora, primarily in the areas most involved and affected by the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade.

Opening lecture in a series on the Arts of Africa at the Alle School of Fine Arts & Design, January 9, 2013. Photo by David Teng Olsen.
Opening lecture in a series on the Arts of Africa at the Alle School of Fine Arts & Design, January 9, 2013. Photo by David Teng Olsen.

As an art historian who specializes in Art of the African Diaspora, this was an important trip for me. I had so many opportunities to investigate in my lectures, in one-on-one conversations with artists, and in seeing artwork a crucial question: what is AFRICAN art? The complexities of this inquiry extend beyond just claiming that it is work produced on the continent. Truth be told, I’m not sure what my expectations were of art of Ethiopia before I arrived in the country. I hadn’t studied the arts of the horn of Africa extensively. The desire and ability to engage the arts community in Addis Ababa has been a privilege. See: Notes on Addis: Art in the Making and Notes on Addis: Netsa Arts Village.

Alle School of Fine Arts & Design, Addis Ababa University

Elizabeth Habte Wold

Behailu Behazbih

After eating a family Christmas dinner, dancing to traditional music with new friends, smelling the mountain air of Yetebon, and greeting artists from all backgrounds, my view of “Africa”—of Ethiopia—has changed. So, I depart Ethiopia grateful for the opportunity to be its guest as a scholar, as a colleague, as a friend.


I’m thrilled to be returning to my husband and children. For those of you that have followed this journey, you know I was extremely nervous (See “The Grind: Going to Ethiopia (Or Can Parents Have it All?)”). The time away from my family has provided me, yes, a much-needed break from the daily stresses. But, boy, did I miss my husband and children. I return refreshed by the warmth of the Ethiopian sun and the coolness of the temperate nights (snow awaits me in Wellesley). While I’ve shown the prettiest pictures possible, I also witnessed abject poverty and the struggles of developing country that is indeed rapidly developing. I return more determined to treasure the health of my children, the comfort of my home, and the security of both my and my husband’s jobs.

Thank you to our friends and neighbors who continuously keep the Greene Team afloat and my children happier than they would be on their own. The “village” back home came through like champions! Different families pulled through with various play dates, emergency pickups from school, and even a sleepover! I knew we couldn’t get through this period without them.

Of course, as parents, my husband and I have both been able to see that we are capable of more than what we thought we could handle individually and more appreciative of what we can do together. We know, too, that we’d rather not manage this life of ours apart. Thank you, Simeon. You are my hero!

I will write more on Ethiopia in the months to come. I promise a post on the FOOD. In the meantime, when I return home, I’ll have some catching up to do with my family and friends. Classes at Wellesley College begin soon. So, once again, if you don’t hear from me through this venue, its because I’ll be on the grind.

Thank you for allowing me to share my rants, victories, frustrations, and smiles along the way! I took comfort knowing that I was not ever alone here. Until the next adventure…

Good Night and Good Luck, Addis!
Goodbye, Addis!

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