“New Perspectives on Portraiture”: Symposium & Book Release at the National Portrait Gallery – Sept. 20-21

The National Portrait Gallery’s Scholarly Center, PORTAL= Portraiture + Analysis, has announced the Edgar P. Richardson Symposium “New Perspectives on Portraiture” to be held in the museum’s Nan Tucker McEvoy Auditorium Sept. 20 and 21. The two-day event will bring together scholars whose work expands people’s perceptions of the diversity and complexity of portrayal in portraits. Speakers will investigate the power dynamics between artists and their sitters, the manipulation and evolution of portraits as physical objects, the dissemination of images and other aspects of this artistic genre.

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beyond the face cover.jpgCoinciding with the release of the new publication Beyond the Face: New Perspectives on Portraiture, which features essays by symposium participants, the two-day event will conclude with a book signing and public reception in the museum’s Kogod Courtyard. I will be presenting on my essay, “Habla LAMADRE: María Magdalena Campos-Pons, Carrie Mae Weems, and Black Feminist Performance.” The book and the symposium have already been reviewed here. This event is free to the public, but registration is required.

As the National Portrait Gallery celebrates its 50th Anniversary, the scholars brought together in Beyond the Face reconsider and expand the boundaries of the very definition of portraiture. As Smithsonian.com recently summarized in “How Can Museums Democratize Portraiture?”

Essays from an assortment of academic portrait experts, including the University of Delaware’s Jennifer Van Horn, the University of Georgia’s Akela Reason, and Wellesley College’s Nikki A. Greene, aim to bring portraiture to the people, showing how evocative images can be appropriated and re-contextualized to fuel social movements, and how seemingly crass variants on portraiture—ranging from newspaper caricature to the modern selfie—have often had the greatest lasting effects on American history.

My take on Campos-Pons’s and Neil Leonard’s (co-collaborator and husband) performance of Habla LAMADRE in 2014 considers how her insertion within the Guggenheim Museum stands as an exemplary performative portrait of a black feminist artist that is at once present and absent, still and in motion, familiar and foreign, historical and contemporary. In concert with the self-portraits and video performances by Carrie Mae Weems that were concurrently on view during her retrospective, Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video. They each distinctly reveal how the portrait of an African diasporic body acts as a site of difference, rupture, fantasy, and indeed, self, in ways not traditionally available in feminist art history. The essay will be expanded in a chapter of my book, Grime, Glass, and Glitter: The Body and the Sonic in Contemporary Black Art (Duke University Press, forthcoming).

See the full program below. I hope you’ll join us!

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Photos by Nikki A. Greene. All rights reserved.

Attendance is free and open to the public. Please register at the following links:

Day 1  | https://richardsonsymposium.eventbrite.com

Day 2 | https://richardsonsymposium2.eventbrite.com

Scholars will discuss such topics as the power dynamics between artists and their sitters, the manipulation and evolution of portraits as physical objects, and the dissemination of images. The symposium will explore how portraiture has evolved and how images of people reflect codes of behavior, social and political environments, and the rhetoric of the day.

Schedule:

Thursday September 20, 2018 2018

8 a.m. Check-in

9 a.m. SESSION 1: Materiality and the Profession of Portraiture

  • “Body Politics: Copley’s Portraits as Political Effigies during the American Revolution”

Lauren Lessing, Director, University of Iowa Stanley Museum of Art

Nina Roth-Wells, Paintings Conservator

Terri Sabatos, Associate Professor of Art History, Longwood University

  • “Prince Demah and the Profession of Portrait Painting”

Jennifer Van Horn, Assistant Professor of Art History and History, University of Delaware

  • “The Other’s Other: Portrait Photography in Latin America, 1890–1930”

Juanita Solano Roa, PhD candidate, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

  • “Meaningful (Dis)placements: The Portrait of Luis Muñoz Marín by Francisco Rodón at the National Portrait Gallery”

Taína Caragol, Curator of Painting and Sculpture and Latino Art and History, Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery

11 a.m. Break

11:15 a.m. SESSION 1 | Panel Discussion

Moderated by Kim Sajet, Director, Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery

12 p.m. Lunch on your own

1:45 p.m. SESSION 2: Dissemination: Furthering Social, Political, Economic, and Religious Agendas

  • “‘Capital Likenesses’: George Washington, the Federal City, and Economic Selfhood in American Portraiture”

Ross Barrett, Associate Professor of American Art, Boston University

  • “Caricature Portraits and Early American Identity”

Allison M. Stagg, Visiting Lecturer in American Art History, Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

  • “Reconstruction Reconsidered: The Gordon Collection of the National Portrait Gallery”

Kate Clarke Lemay, Historian and Director of PORTAL, Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery

  • “Cloud of Witnesses: Painting History through Combinative Portraiture”

Christopher Allison, Collegiate Assistant Professor in the Humanities, Affiliate Faculty Member in the

Departments of History and Art History, University of Chicago

3:45 p.m. Break

4 p.m. SESSION 2 | Panel Discussion

Moderated by Wendy Wick Reaves, Curator Emerita of Prints and Drawings, Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery

Friday September 21, 2018

8 a.m. Check-in

9 a.m. SESSION 3: Reassessing Subjectivity

  • “Soul-Searching: The Portrait in Gilded Age America”

Akela Reason, Associate Professor of History, University of Georgia

  • “Photos of Style and Dignity: Woodard’s Studios and the Delivery of Black Modern Subjectivity”

Amy M. Mooney, Associate Professor of Art and Art History, Columbia College, Chicago

  • “Side Eye: Early Twentieth-Century American Portraiture on the Periphery”

Jonathan Frederick Walz, Director of Curatorial Affairs and Curator of American Art, The Columbus Museum

  • “Making Sense of Our Selfie Nation”

Richard H. Saunders, Director, Middlebury College Museum of Art, and Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Middlebury College

11 a.m. Break

11:15 a.m. SESSION 3 | Panel Discussion

Moderated by Kate Clarke Lemay, Historian and Director of PORTAL, Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery

12 p.m. Lunch on your own

1:45 p.m. SESSION 4: Theatricality, Performativity, and Play

  • “‘Let Me Take Your Head’: Photographic Portraiture and the Gilded Age Celebrity Image”

Erin Pauwels, Assistant Professor of Art History, Temple University

  • “Playing Against Type: Frank Matsura’s Photographic Performances”

ShiPu Wang, Professor of Art History and founding faculty of the Global Arts Studies Program, University of California, Merced

  • “Call It a Little Game between ‘I’ and ‘Me’: Mar/Cel Duchamp in the Wilson-Lincoln System”

Anne Collins Goodyear, Co-Director, Bowdoin College Museum of Art

  • “Habla LAMADRE: María Magdalena Campos-Pons, Carrie Mae Weems, and Black Feminist Performance”

Nikki A. Greene, Assistant Professor of Art History, Wellesley College

3:45 p.m. Break

4 p.m. SESSION 4 | Panel Discussion

Moderated by Asma Naeem, Chief Curator, Baltimore Museum of Art

5 p.m. Book Signing and Reception in Kogod Courtyard

FEMINISMS UNBOUND @ MIT – The Dark Room: Race and Gender in the Visual Archive – Feb. 11

The Graduate Consortium of Women’s Studies series “Feminisms Unbound” continues at MIT on February 11 featuring members of The Dark Room: Race and Visual Culture Faculty Seminar: Irene Mata (Wellesley College), Sandy Alexandre (MIT), Marcia Chatelain (Georgetown University), and moderator/co-organizer Kimberly Juanita Brown (Brown University). I’ll talk specifically about Kara Walker’s A Subtlety, the sugar installation at the Domino Factory in Brooklyn from last summer. Join us!

Mammy in waiting
Kara Walker’s “A Subtlety…”(July 2014).  Photo by Nikki A. Greene.
The Dark Room: Race and Gender in the Visual Archive
Wednesday, February 11th: 5:30 – 7:30 PM
Location: The Moore Room, Building 6 Room 321

In the intellectual tributary that is critical race theory, all is connected.  Whether the task is elucidating the gendered trajectory of imperialism and violence in the United States, examining indigenous art forms in Latin America, or probing the interstices of Caribbean cultural production in the 20th century, critical race theorists have always engaged the world of the visual.  Bringing together scholars invested in the work of critical race studies as visual culture offers a unique vantage point through which to imagine the future of visual culture studies. The Dark Room is an interdisciplinary working group of scholars interested in theories of visuality and theories of racial formation.   In this roundtable each feminist scholar will select an image and interpret it in relation to its archive.

 

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