Notes on Addis: A Look Back

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This week, I was thrilled to see Addis Ababa listed at #13 on the New York Times’ Top 52 places in the world to visit. Why? According to the headline: “An ambitious art scene heads toward the international stage.” Anyone who has been there knows this to be true. This time last year, I got to see Addis for myself. PThe Times highlights Asni Gallery, which stood only doors away from my hotel. I had a chance to meet the gracious gallery owner, Konjit Seyoum. If you’re in Addis Ababa, go to Asni. FYI: They have a small, but delicious lunch and dinner menu.

Teaching African Art at the Alle School of Fine Arts and Design
Teaching African Art at the Alle School of Fine Arts and Design

I was initially hesitant to leave my family for three weeks (The Grind: Going to Ethiopia (Or Can Parents Really Have it All?), but I joined my Wellesley College colleagues multi-media artist David Teng Olsen and Ethiopian native and filmmaker Salem Mekuria. Salem, really was the one responsible for bringing us both to Addis. She arranged an invitation from the Alle School of Fine Arts and Design to teach the History of the Arts of Africa.  What a joy to speak to an engaged audience of students and faculty over a series of days. It was humbling, really. I had the renown artist, Bekele Mekonnen, listening. Also, in the seats sat the young artist and Director of the Netsa Art Village, Mihret Kebebe. She was one of many fine hosts that extended her friendship during my time there and even today (thanks to Twitter and email). I’m grateful for all the memories that came swirling back this week. The food. The people. The ART. 

Upon my return, I had an opportunity to thank the Friends of the Wellesley College Library directly for the funding to donate books to the Alle School’s library in the Spring 2013 newsletter.

Screen Shot 2014-01-15 at 11.37.45 PMFor my posts from Ethiopia, see the following:

Notes on Addis: Arrival

Notes on Addis: Art in the Making 

Notes on Addis: Netsa Art Village

Notes on Addis: Departure

The Grind: Mama PhD? Yes, I can!

This is a long overdue follow-up to a previous commentary on “Going To Ethiopia (Or Can Parents Really Have It All?).” I managed to spend three weeks in Ethiopia in January teaching African Art and taking in the sights, sounds, and smiles of Addis Ababa. Some of my readers followed my journey via this website and Facebook on my experiences I titled “Notes from Addis.” It was a successful trip, and I am sure that I will return. Being a Mama PhD abroad is only possible through the immeasurable support of my husband who holds down the fort for me during my absences.

My family at the Davis Museum of Art, Wellesley College. Fall 2012.
My family at the Davis Museum of Art, Wellesley College. Fall 2012. Photo by Judith Black.

What many of my readers did not know was that I was also on the job market. The academic job market is no joke. For those outside of higher education, the fact that the entire process from initial application to phone interview to campus interview to rejection/offer can take up to six months. So, in the midst of my world travel, I had the added pleasure/stress of pursuing tenure-track positions across the country. This process required even more days away from home almost as soon as I returned from Africa. In the midst of it all–teaching, parenting, interviewing–I did land a job. If you’ve already taken a look at my title, you know that I managed to land a place on the impressive (and therefore humbling) faculty in the Department of Art at Wellesley College as an Assistant Professor of Art, the Arts of Africa and the African Diaspora, specifically. Phew!

What I think many find particularly significant is that I did this with two small children. Due to my previous posts on this website, my little ones were no secret to my potential employers, including Wellesley College. One of my friends commented on how surprised she was that I didn’t just talk about my kids, but that I joyfully marched them around campus in full view of my colleagues (my kids kind of think the campus is an extended playground)! Actually, what she said was, “If it were me, I would have kicked them in the bushes.” Ok, that sounds cruel, but I understood her concern. Kids take up an immense amount of time, critical time to write, research, attend meetings, teach, write some more, especially when you’re trying to land tenure. What can I say? I’m a proud Mama PhD! I learned a long time ago when I decided to have my first child while I was writing my dissertation that academia was going to have to accept me with all of my grown-up responsibilities of raising a family during my childbearing years. On the flip side, I have had to rise to the challenge of accepting the demands of academia with my family in tow.

While many men do take on a lot of the responsibility for child-rearing, women tend to take on the bulk of the work of raising children, especially in academia due to our flexible schedules. Even when it comes to parental leave for the birth of a child, men tend to use the time to advance their research while most women use that time to, you know, take care of her newborn (See “On Parental Leave, Men Have It Easier,” Chronicle of Higher Education, January 7, 2005). For any woman struggling to advance a career in academia with a family, it is no secret that the balancing act takes the support of one’s immediate family, extended family, neighbors, friends, near and far to manage. As I juggle the summer schedule, self-imposed deadlines for articles and fall class prep are my motivation in the midst of camp and daycare drop-offs and pickups. Early mornings, late nights, and weekend work-days are the only way to accomplish my goals. Again, the supportive husband pictured above has made this compromise feasible.

My daughter spent a week taking classes at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. I dropped her off and picked her up most days. An exhausting and fulfilling opportunity.
My daughter spent a week taking classes at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. I dropped her off and picked her up most days. An exhausting and fulfilling opportunity.

I lean on my local “village” of neighbors (’cause it takes one to raise a child, right?) who are willing to take care of my kids in a pinch. Other times, I may just whine to my mom on the phone 200 miles away. The knowledge that I have peers and mentors who are also enduring (or who have already survived) similar situations comforts me in the midst of the struggle.

Two recent events this spring highlight a network of women who remind me that I am strong enough and human enough to do what I need/want to do as a Mama PhD. First, one my GFF’s (Grad Friend Forever), Tanya Pohrt, the Marcia Brady Tucker Fellow in American Paintings and Sculpture at the Yale University Art Gallery, defended her dissertation at the University of Delaware. She was the final member of our cohort of five who completed the doctoral program in the Department of Art History. I, along with two other GFF’s, surprised her when she emerged from the room. We each have two kids each. We each have jobs in either academia or museums. We each know the challenges faced to accomplish this tremendous accomplishment. We thought it important to mark the occasion together as fellow Mama PhDs!

The second event was Wellesley College’s 2013 Commencement. My colleagues at Wellesley are extraordinary. Again, I am humbled to join the ranks of the faculty here. I was grateful to take a photo with my fellow female scholars of African descent. Certainly scholars of color face additional stressors due to race and institutional racism in order to not only complete the PhD, but also to thrive in academia. [I’ll save my comments on race perhaps for another post. In the meantime, see the recent publication, Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia.]

Drs. Brenna Greer, Layli Maparyan, Filomina Steady, Tracey Cameron, Angela Carpenter and Nikki Greene. May 2013. Copyright Nikki A. Greene.
Drs. Brenna Greer, Layli Maparyan, Filomina Steady, Tracey Cameron, Angela Carpenter and Nikki Greene at Wellesley College. May 2013. Copyright Nikki A. Greene.

This picture will continue to remind me that there are women who struggle and achieve by my side (single, married, with and without children). I thank all of these women–friends, colleagues, neighbors–who make being a Mama PhD not only possible, but a thrill.

Notes from Addis: Departure

Elizabeth Habte Wold, "Africa Rising"
Elizabeth Habte Wold, “Africa Rising”

My journey to Ethiopia has come to an end. I look forward to coming back because Africa is rising for me. Not the sentimental Africa that has filled my historical imagination of suspended roots of Yoruba, Fon or Mende, but rather a real Africa, an experienced Africa that surely extends beyond a myopic idea of Africa.  I’ve known this as I’ve been studying the arts of Africa for nearly twenty years and teaching on the complexities and dynamism of the continent for the last four. My concentration has always been on Western and Central Africa and the diaspora, primarily in the areas most involved and affected by the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade.

Opening lecture in a series on the Arts of Africa at the Alle School of Fine Arts & Design, January 9, 2013. Photo by David Teng Olsen.
Opening lecture in a series on the Arts of Africa at the Alle School of Fine Arts & Design, January 9, 2013. Photo by David Teng Olsen.

As an art historian who specializes in Art of the African Diaspora, this was an important trip for me. I had so many opportunities to investigate in my lectures, in one-on-one conversations with artists, and in seeing artwork a crucial question: what is AFRICAN art? The complexities of this inquiry extend beyond just claiming that it is work produced on the continent. Truth be told, I’m not sure what my expectations were of art of Ethiopia before I arrived in the country. I hadn’t studied the arts of the horn of Africa extensively. The desire and ability to engage the arts community in Addis Ababa has been a privilege. See: Notes on Addis: Art in the Making and Notes on Addis: Netsa Arts Village.

Alle School of Fine Arts & Design, Addis Ababa University

Elizabeth Habte Wold

Behailu Behazbih

After eating a family Christmas dinner, dancing to traditional music with new friends, smelling the mountain air of Yetebon, and greeting artists from all backgrounds, my view of “Africa”—of Ethiopia—has changed. So, I depart Ethiopia grateful for the opportunity to be its guest as a scholar, as a colleague, as a friend.

Highlights:

I’m thrilled to be returning to my husband and children. For those of you that have followed this journey, you know I was extremely nervous (See “The Grind: Going to Ethiopia (Or Can Parents Have it All?)”). The time away from my family has provided me, yes, a much-needed break from the daily stresses. But, boy, did I miss my husband and children. I return refreshed by the warmth of the Ethiopian sun and the coolness of the temperate nights (snow awaits me in Wellesley). While I’ve shown the prettiest pictures possible, I also witnessed abject poverty and the struggles of developing country that is indeed rapidly developing. I return more determined to treasure the health of my children, the comfort of my home, and the security of both my and my husband’s jobs.

Thank you to our friends and neighbors who continuously keep the Greene Team afloat and my children happier than they would be on their own. The “village” back home came through like champions! Different families pulled through with various play dates, emergency pickups from school, and even a sleepover! I knew we couldn’t get through this period without them.

Of course, as parents, my husband and I have both been able to see that we are capable of more than what we thought we could handle individually and more appreciative of what we can do together. We know, too, that we’d rather not manage this life of ours apart. Thank you, Simeon. You are my hero!

I will write more on Ethiopia in the months to come. I promise a post on the FOOD. In the meantime, when I return home, I’ll have some catching up to do with my family and friends. Classes at Wellesley College begin soon. So, once again, if you don’t hear from me through this venue, its because I’ll be on the grind.

Thank you for allowing me to share my rants, victories, frustrations, and smiles along the way! I took comfort knowing that I was not ever alone here. Until the next adventure…

Good Night and Good Luck, Addis!
Goodbye, Addis!

Notes from Addis: Netsa Art Village

A day spent around art and artists is always already a good day, and I went to the Netsa Art Village in Addis Ababa. I had the privilege of getting to know the artists and their works on view and in the studio/storage spaces available to the eleven artists who have committed to making the Netsa Art Village, established in 2008, a thriving contemporary art venue. With few financial resources or government support, these artists do it all from managing everyday administrative duties to constructing the very exhibition spaces needed to display their works. In addition to serving area children through workshops and community projects, this grassroots organization is building on a small, but eager contemporary art scene. In fact, from what I observed, they are defining it.

When I decided to come to Ethiopia to teach at the Alle School of Fine Arts and Design, I thought that teaching alone would suffice. I know now that more must and can be done by way of scholarship on contemporary art in Ethiopia. I feel obligated to write more. Not in this space, but more will come. More must come. Art from the African continent has long been an afterthought on the art market, in art criticism and on the pages of important journals, Nka: Journal of Contemporary Art, African Arts, and, most recently, Transition, notwithstanding. I hope to add my voice to the choir (through a formal article) of those who would like to advocate for artists and locations like Netsa Art Village in Addis Ababa that keep art communities alive and thriving through passion, commitment and undying energy despite many obstacles, especially bureaucratic, in order to provide knowledge of and access to fine arts.

Here is a description of the Netsa Art Village from the website:

Netsa is a membership organization which exists to stimulate the quality, development and context for contemporary art practice in Ethiopia. We aim to broaden the constituency for contemporary art in a global environment by initiating and facilitating professional networking and communication, a dynamic exchange of information and presentations of examples of good practice. It is founded on a willingness to work together to identify and pool resources, meeting challenges with efficient channels of communication, collective problem-solving, and sharing knowledge and experience.

Beautiful Grounds

Hard work, a cooperative spirit, and an inspirational vibe are found here at Netsa Art Village.

Notes from Addis: Art in the Making

My first full day in Addis. Kibrom Gebremedhin, a painter and the head of the Art Education Department at the Alle School of Fine Arts and Design, took me on a tour of the campus (more on Kibrom after I attend his exhibition and artist talk on Sunday). It’s a beautiful setting. Nestled between residences and two elementary schools, I got the sense from Kibrom that the courtyard was an especially cozy place for the students to relax, commiserate  and to get inspired.

I met some of the faculty and a few students. Of course, I enjoy meeting faculty, but I really enjoy meeting students. Lucky for me, there were a few around making art! I am an art historian. I begin teaching on Tuesday. And, THAT, ladies and gents, is why I am here.

Painting studio

Sculpture Studio

Printmaking studio

Fashion Design

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